Private Chris Bell-Chambers, a member of the Sniper Section, 3rd Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment (3RAR), smiles and waves to a group of Korean children who have emerged from their hiding place after their village has been cleared of enemy forces. Snow lies on the ground and on the roofs of houses in the village. The rifle PTE Bell-Chambers is carrying on his shoulder is a .303 inch Short Magazine Lee Enfield.
Private Chris Bell-Chambers, a member of the Sniper Section, 3rd Battalion, The Royal Australian Regiment (3RAR), smiles and waves to a group of Korean children who have emerged from their hiding place after their village has been cleared of enemy forces. Snow lies on the ground and on the roofs of houses in the village. The rifle PTE Bell-Chambers is carrying on his shoulder is a .303 inch Short Magazine Lee Enfield.

Beginning on 25 June 1950, the Korean War lasted three years and claimed millions of lives. Despite being called The Forgotten War, it remains among one of the most brutal and bloodiest conflicts this century.

Twenty-one nations contributed forces and medical support to the United Nations Command, including Australia. At the war’s end in 1953, the United Nations forces counted some 40,000 dead, including 340 Australians. More than 130,000 South Korean soldiers lost their lives fighting in the Korean War.

Combat Forces

    • Republic of Korea (South Korea)
    • United States
    • United Kingdom
    • Philippines
    • Thailand
    • Canada
    • Turkey
    • Australia
    • New Zealand
    • Ethiopia
    • Greece
    • France
    • Colombia
    • Belgium
    • South Africa
    • Netherlands
    • Luxembourg

Humanitarian Aid

    • Denmark
    • India
    • Italy
    • Norway
    • Sweden

We should also remember the Chinese and North Korean forces that fought. Such is the folly of war.

At 10.00 am on 27 July 1953, an armistice was signed by an American officer and his and North Korean counterpart. The war was over, or so it would seem on paper.

60 years later, and tensions on the Korean peninsula seem to be worse than ever since that time. A peaceful settlement is needed, not only in a political dimension to put to rest The Cold War, but between brothers divided on the Korean peninsula.

Join us on Saturday 27 July 2013 at 11.00 am, to remember the sacrifice made by veterans from all countries at the NSW Government Korean War Veterans Remembrance Ceremony. The service will be held at the Korean War Memorial located at the northern end of Moore Park (next to the SCG). The memorial can be found behind the big intersection of Flinders St, Moore Park Road, and Anzac Parade.

Bring some flowers to lay on the memorial stone during the service, even if you don’t know anyone who served in the war. After the service, join us for a small morning tea on site, and get to meet some of the veterans who fought.

The following buses arrive at the closest bus stop to the memorial on Flinders St. Buses can be hailed up at Central Station (Eddy Avenue). Times shown their arrival at the Flinders St Metrobus stop 7/8E:

Bus number Time arrival at Flinders St
394 10:14
373 10:15
396 10:22
392 10:29
397 10:34
373 10:35
339 10:37
377 10:40
399 10:44
374, 396 10:52
373 10:55
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